Artist Studios

I consult and advocate for the physical studio needs of professional artists.  These needs became the focus of my MFA studies at Seattle University and the topic of my capstone paper.  Here's a preview:

Generally speaking the public understands and supports the visual artists’ need for space to display and sell their work but the need for a working studio space seems to fall below the radar.

Many artists that pursue a professional art education spend some time studying in a fine arts center; a facility housing multiple working studios in numerous disciplines. Such facilities create a sense of community, offer artists a support system, and foster creativity and collaboration. However such communities of working artists are difficult to find outside the academic setting.  

The development of a property with multiple artist studios under one roof removes artists from working in seclusion, inspires and validates a community of artists, connects them with one-another and creates engagement with the public.  It can also increase property values, ancillary spending, and tax roll contributions.

“If we value art, we must value artists. Ensuring there are appropriate, secure facilities for the long term means artists can continue to make work and contribute to a creative and vibrant city for the benefit of all” (Acme, 2006a).
  


IF YOU'D LIKE TO KNOW MORE I INVITE YOU TO READ MY CAPSTONE PAPER (link below).